Tag: flash fiction

New flash in Electric Literature’s Recommended Reading

Pretty thrilled to be mentioned in the same sentence as Lydia Davis and Amelia Gray, I’m not gonna lie…

“For the 300th issue of Recommended Reading, which happens to fall on Valentine’s Day, we opened submissions to your 300-word stories of love and heartbreak. Every day this week, we’ll publish two of our favorites from the nearly 500 submissions we received, along with contributions from three greats of flash fiction, Lydia Davis, Amelia Gray, and Kathy Fish. We think of this special five-part issue as a love letter to the thousands of writers who have submitted to Recommended Reading, and the hundreds of thousands who have read our magazine over the past five and a half years. Thank you for sticking with us, and cheers to 300 more.” —Halimah Marcus

My piece is up now, kicking off what promises to be a stellar week. Read it here: “i love you.”

And don’t miss Dorothy Bendel’s terrific piece, “Thank You For Your Order.”

Here’s to new adventures…

Playa Negra, Costa Rica

I’m so excited (and a little nervous!) this beautiful morning. Today, my amazing, multi-talented friend, Nancy Stohlman, and I are launching the website for our new adventure: Flash Fiction Retreats. Months of planning and exchanging roughly nine hundred million emails have resulted in our forthcoming writing retreats: Breckenridge, Colorado in August and (drumroll) stunning Costa Rica in January of 2019! I’m so grateful for Nancy’s energy and unflagging enthusiasm. It’s going to be so much fun and I can’t wait to work and write in person with both people I know and new friends. Anyway, wish us luck! I hope you will consider joining us. And stay tuned, we’ve got much more in store for you.

“I wondered about the explorers who’d sailed their ships to the end of the world. How terrified they must have been when they risked falling over the edge; how amazed to discover, instead, places they had seen only in their dreams.” Jodi Picoult

“Collective Nouns for Humans in the Wild” featured at One Great Things

Honored that my flash, “Collective Nouns for Humans in the Wild” was featured at Michael Schmeltzer and Meghan McClure’s wonderful new blog, One Great Things. Many thanks.

“Fish’s inventive and joyful use of language is on full display from the beginning. (“A group of grandmothers is a tapestry. A group of toddlers, a jubilance.”) Within the smallest flash package (a mere 135 words or so) we unpack rhythms and delightful diction, emotions that take us from glee to awe to reverence. But just as we are “gathered and feeling good,” Fish gives us a turn, she gives us knowledge we can’t return from.”

The whole review may be read HERE.

“Stop Dragging: A One-Act Play” up at Hobart

“Stop Dragging: A One-Act Play”

I wrote a weirdo one-act play with nine characters and remarkably, Hobart magazine published it.

Thanks so much to guest editor Bud Smith.

It’s been a slow year for me publishing-wise, but I’m proud of what I did get out there. I’ve received no less than six Pushcart nominations for my work this year and yeah, Pushcart gets over 10,000 nominations yearly, so I’m not holding my breath. Still it’s nice for the small recognition and I’m grateful to the small publishers and especially publishers of flash fiction, who nominate against all odds.

Happy holidays and here’s to a much brighter New Year. Love and peace. Stay strong, my friends.

“Collective Nouns for Humans in the Wild” at Jellyfish Review

(Image by Eva Rinaldi)

Dusting off my blog here with some news…My piece, “Collective Nouns for Humans in the Wild” was recently published at the wonderful Jellyfish Review. I’d been asked to contribute by editor Christopher James to celebrate their 2nd anniversary and had another piece cued up, but then the shooting in Las Vegas happened and I was so shaken and devastated I wrote this piece and asked Chris if he’d publish it instead. To his great credit, he agreed. Anyway, it weighs in at under 150 words and I’ve seen people call it a poem, a flash fiction, even an essay. I think it’s sort of a hybrid piece, a prose poem. Doesn’t matter. I’m glad I wrote it and I’m extremely grateful for the huge response. Thank you, everyone who has read and shared the piece and for those of you who wrote to me about it.

“The Heart of Flash” Weekend Flash with Word Tango Sept. 23-25th – Registration Open!

I’m very excited to teach “The Heart of Flash: Characters Who Yearn,” an all new weekend flash workshop with Word Tango.

Registration is now open and spaces are limited! Go HERE to read some really nice testimonials for my classes and to sign up!

Best Small Fictions 2016 Launches TODAY!

BSF 2016 front copySo honored that my story, “A Room With Many Small Beds” from RIFT, and originally published in Threadcount Magazine, was chosen by Stuart Dybek for inclusion in this stellar anthology. Congratulations also to my co-author, Robert Vaughan, whose story, “A Box” (also in RIFT) was also selected. Huge thanks to Tara Masih and her team for their tireless efforts in showcasing the best in short short fiction from all over the world. And of course, thanks to Stuart Dybek, whose work I admire so much.

From the Goodreads page: “This second installment of The Best Small Fictions continues to celebrate the diversity and quality captured in fiction forms fewer than 1,000 words. Forty-five acclaimed and emerging writers—including Alberto Chimal, Toh EnJoe, Kathy Fish, Amelia Gray, Etgar Keret, R. O. Kwon, and Eliel Lucero—offer readers “some of the brightest concise writing available today” (NewPages). With spotlights on Texture Press and author Megan Giddings, the acclaimed new series, with its “finger on the pulse,” succeeds in its aim to make something big from many small things.”

Featuring Small Fictions by:

Amir Adam, Daniel Aristi, Tina Barry, Paul Beckman, Laurie Blauner, John Brantingham, Alberto Chimal, Justin Lawrence Daugherty, Toh EnJoe, Grant Faulkner, Kathy Fish, Rosie Forrest,Megan Giddings, Amelia Gray, Charles Hansmann, Britt Haraway, Mary-Jane Holmes, Laird Hunt, A. Nicole Kelly, James Kennedy, Etgar Keret, R. O. Kwon, Nathan Leslie, Paul Lisicky, Eliel Lucero, Nancy Ludmerer, Melissa Manning, Michael Martone, Elizabeth Morton, David Naimon, Jessica Plante, Dianca London Potts, Dawn Raffel, James Reidel, Sophie Rosenblum, Caitlin Scarano, Vincent Scarpa, Robert Scotellaro, Courtney Sender, Janey Skinner, Curtis Smith, Robert Vaughan, Clio Velentza

“Prepare to be surprised by this striking new series–it has quickly become essential reading.” ~Amy Hempel

ALL NEW weekend flash workshop with Word Tango in Sept. Stay tuned!

I’m teaming up with the wonderful Word Tango in September for a new online flash fiction course, Sept. 23-25th! Stay tuned for more details and get on the mailing list for updates and first dibs on registration. These are always a lot of fun for me to teach (and fun for the participants too, I hope!):

Word Tango Weekend Flash with Kathy Fish

New Stories & Interview At The Short Story

TSSLovely Marie Gethins interviewed me about all things flash and my recent co-authored flash collection with Robert Vaughan, RIFT, for The Short Story. Marie asked great questions!

I have a couple of new stories published in stellar places! First, “Imagine Your Daughter Is a Cherry Red Convertible,” a micro under 100 words, at New World Writing. Many thanks to editors Kim Chinquee and Frederick Barthelme.

And “I Have Not Pushed Back My Cuticles with An Orange Stick Since the Nixon Administration,” at the wonderful, long-standing journal, Monkeybicycle. Monkeybicycle published one of my first stories, “The Next Stanley Kubrick,” back in 2007 or so. I’m honored to be back. Thanks so much to editor James Tate Hill.

dodge luhan houseAnd wow, it’s August already! Looking forward to the workshop I’m running with Robert Vaughan in Taos later this month. Some few spaces remain if you’re interested in joining us! What a magical place.

Wigleaf Top 50!

Artwork by Philip Bond
Artwork by Philip Bond
Well. I am astounded and grateful that two of my stories were chosen by Matthew Salesses for the 2015 Wigleaf Top 50. Both stories, “Ripe” and “Tool” were published by Lauren Becker, editor of the wonderful Corium Magazine. I also thrilled that my story “The Children Called Him Yuck-Yuck” published by Ellen Parker in FRiGG, was chosen for the long list. I’m very honored to be among the fantastic writers on both lists.

Thanks so much to Selecting Editor, Matthew Salesses, as well as Series Editor, Marcelle Heath and all of her team of readers. And thanks, of course, to Scott Garson, editor of Wigleaf. This is a huge effort every year to recognize and showcase the best flash fiction published online. As Marcelle Heath says in her foreword:

Flash fiction opens up the page, becomes larger and more fluid, and gives back to us so that we can see what remains: vitality, provocation, enchantment.

Again, thanks so much. I had a few painful years of hardly writing at all. This and all the recognition my stories have received this past year mean the world to me.

Two of My Stories Featured in Francis Ford Coppola’s 1st Ever Story Vending Machine in the U.S.

zoetrope cafeThis is the most fun thing to happen in my writing life in a long time. Two of my stories have been chosen to be sold in the first ever story vending machine in the U.S. This has been introduced already in France and Coppola unveiled his story machine at Zoetrope Cafe in San Francisco last week. More about this HERE! If you’re in San Francisco, do check it out and buy a story! story vending machine

Robert Vaughan & I interviewed on the Other People Podcast with Brad Listi

PodcastDuring our time in L.A. for AWP Robert Vaughan and I visited Brad Listi and chatted in his garage where he makes the fabulous Other People Podcast. We conversed at length about our co-authored collection, Rift, life, our childhoods, current events, and more. We’re told this was Brad’s first interview with flash fiction writers! He is a brilliant & generous host and we had a great time. Rift was The Nervous Breakdown Book Club feature for December and Brad heads up that as well.

You can listen here: Other People Podcast, Episode 411other people podcast

You can get the Other People Podcast App or listen via ITunes Or you can sign up for Go Premium which helps to support the podcast and gives you access to all the many great interviews with such writers as George Saunders, Elizabeth Crane, Roxane Gay, Cheryl Strayed, Edwidge Danticat, Jonathan Letham, Tom Perrotta, Susan Orlean, Sheila Heti, and more!

Happy News! Best Small Fictions 2016, Etc.

BSF 2016 front copyMy story, “A Room With Many Small Beds” (originally published in Threadcount Magazine and the first story in Rift) was chosen by Stuart Dybek for inclusion in the Queen’s Ferry Press Best Small Fictions 2016! I’m just so thrilled. Another story, “A Proper Party,” originally published in Revolution John and also included in Rift, made the finalist list. And hurray for Rift, as another story from the book, Robert Vaughan’s excellent “A Box” ALSO made the winner list and will be included in the anthology of 45 small fictions for 2016. Congratulations to Robert! Many thanks to series editor superwoman Tara Masih and all of the consulting editors, as well as guest editor Stuart Dybek.

The full list of winners, semi-finalists, and finalists may be found HERE. Congratulations to all the great writers and the journals that published and nominated their work! Special congratulations to beloved Smokelong Quarterly, which has THREE stories among the 45 winners!

In other good news, I’m so pleased that my story of a three-horned woman, “There Is No Albuquerque” is published in the new “Wild” themed issue of Newfound Journal. That story is also featured in Rift. You may find the story HERE. Oh and read the whole, glorious issue, which also features “Daughters of The Animal Kingdom” by the great Bonnie Jo Campbell.

RIFT is coming to Kindle soon! And lots of other news…

RIFT 4th July*Happy to announce that RIFT (Unknown Press), co-authored with Robert Vaughan, will be available on Kindle soon. Will keep you posted!

There’s been a flurry of press for RIFT recently, in the form of reviews (Change Seven Magazine and Goodreads), two interviews (Midwestern Gothic and Bartleby Snopes) and research notes at Necessary Fiction. If you’re interested, please follow the links below:

Interview with Rachel Hurwitz at Midwestern Gothic

Research Notes for RIFT by Kathy Fish & Robert Vaughan at Necessary Fiction

Interview with Leonora Desar at Bartleby Snopes

Review of RIFT by Anne Weisgerber at Change Seven Magazine

Goodreads review of RIFT by Al Kratz

Goodreads review of RIFT by Steve Karas, author of Kinda Sorta American Dream

Goodreads review of RIFT by Meg Tuite, author of Bound by Blue & Lined Up Like Scars

I will be conducting another weekend workshop through Word Tango in May. This time, we will focus on writing flash creative nonfiction. Go here for more info and to get on the mailing list!

Tomorrow I begin my SIXTH Fast Flash© Workshop! Very excited to work with a new group of amazing writers!

*cover photography courtesy of Casey McSpadden

Writing & The Importance of Community: A Conversation with Gay Degani, Author of Rattle of Want

GayI recently invited Gay Degani to Denver to participate at the Mercury Café where Nancy Stohlman curates the monthly reading series called the F-Bomb. The “F” refers to flash fiction, and because Gay has a collection of mostly flash stories, Rattle of Want, (Pure Slush Books), it felt like a good fit. She and Sally Reno took to the stage taking turns reading their short fiction. During the visit, Gay and I spent time talking about writing and about community. These are some of the questions I asked her.

(You may listen HERE to a podcast of the event with many thanks to the amazing Rocky Mountain Revival and Levi Andrew Noe!)

The F-Bomb readings are a community event. How has “community” impacted your writing?

I have to say that if I hadn’t discovered the writers I’ve met via the Internet, I’m not sure I would be writing today. I’d taken extension classes at UCLA, gone to the Iowa Writing Festival for several summers, and run a long-term writing group at my house, and even though I’d had a couple stories published, the process of sending manuscripts through the mail and following the “no simultaneous submissions” rule, made my publication prospects seem dismal.

Once I learned about the web and the writing community there, my world became brighter. First there were the forums at several e-zines including Every Day Fiction and through them, I learned what readers expected. Then I discovered Zoetrope and Fictionaut, both offering opportunities to learn from other writers. I understood that this was key to becoming good at something, anything. A writer must practice, experiment, and receive feedback.

The best part for me, however, was having access to so many wonderful writers that I could never have met in the real world, but were there, doing what I was doing in the virtual world. I learned much from what they thought and what they were doing. And Kathy, you were one of those people I admired and when you stepped in and critiqued one of my stories at Zoetrope, I was over the moon!

Author Christopher Allen says, “Rattle of Want is a narrative road trip across America.” Most of your stories seem grounded in community.RATTLE OF WANT 2

I feel as if we are where-we-live and who-we-know, especially writers, and a big part of our work comes from those who are part of our community. I’m not saying that we write about the individuals we know in particular, but our observations, our references for most of us come from the world around us, the people around us. In Rattle of Want, there many stories set in identifiable communities: desert towns, Midwest towns, Los Angeles, and points in between. Landscape and how towns form around that landscape almost always come up for me.

In “Isla Vista, 1970,” I draw on the campus unrest at UCSB over the firing of a teacher. The students burned down the Bank of America. This was a memorable event in my life, the impact it had on me. The story itself is not drawn from real life, though I did have a friend who was Miss Santa Barbara at the time, but the time and place together, the setting, is what I wanted to serve as an exploration into the dynamics of that time. “Small Town,” Starkville,” “Spring Melt” all concern themselves with people who exist in towns that suggest confinement. “Ruby,” “The Last Real Human Being in Hollywood,” and “Oranges” are about the alienation of living in a big city. The novella at the end of the collection, The Old Road, is about a small community on the edge of town and what happens in their lives after a huge windstorm knocks down an ancient oak, crushing one of their bungalows.

What makes a community work?

We saw this in action in Denver, Nancy Stohlman working hard to give local (and not so local, like me) writers the opportunity to share their work, Sally Reno working hard to make sure we brought the showbiz to our reading, and you, Kathy, being the perfect hostess, keeping everyone relaxed and having fun. On a real life level, we have to make sure we participate and support the events that come our way. The same is true online. We have to be there for each other with encouragement at both ends of the spectrum, before we finish and polish our work, and then again, when we put ourselves out there in the public forum.

This isn’t pie-in-sky hope. This has happened to me: the support and caring from my community has been consistent and generous. I thank all of you writers out there in Germany, Canada, Australia, the U.K, and of course, in the U.S, for all you’ve done to help live my dream of becoming a writer.

Thanks so much, Gay! It was such a blast having you here in Denver for F-Bomb!

Bio: Gay Degani has had three of her flash pieces nominated for Pushcart and won the 11th Annual Glass Woman Prize. Pure Slush Books released her collection of stories, Rattle of Want, (November 2015). She has a suspense novel, What Came Before, published in 2014, and a short collection, Pomegranate, featuring eight stories around the theme of mothers and daughters. Founder and editor emeritus of Flash Fiction Chronicles, she is an editor at Smokelong Quarterly and blogs at Words in Place where a list of her published work can be found.

Show original message